Ostsee – verborgene Fracht/Baltic Sea – hidden cargo 2

I spent the last two weeks capturing new images for my photographic series “Baltic Sea – hidden cargo” in Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia and Finland. Find the editorial text for this series here. The Baltic Sea is a unique natural area which suffers from human exploitation.

This picture below shows the Baltic Sea in the Kurische Nehrung in Lithuania.

Baltic Sea – behind the scenes 3

Carrying a field camera for my series “Baltic Sea – hidden cargo” is no fun. Try to reduce the weight by renouncing on lenses or gear you do not really need. I decided to take two lenses with me (150mm, 90mm), a spotmeter, a sekonic lightmeter, a few film holders, front and rear panels, bellow, hardware, films. Don´t forget the massive tripod. So I was able to get even to remote spots quite quickly.

img_0979_20160623_grading_neu1

IMG_1046_20160625

Heading back to the car for about 750m through a swedish forest in the evening is no fun, too. Hungry midges all the way made me run like a pro.

BALTIC SEA – behind the scenes 2

June 25, 2016

My tour for “Baltic Sea – hidden cargo” leads through sweden. The lovely country has a long coast. Nuclear power is common in sweden for decades though the majority of the people wanted to leave it since the 1980ies. Nuclear industry knew well how to slow down the exit and has great plans for the nuclear future especially for the final disposal of nuclear waste. Happening so in Forsmark, mid-sweden, where a final nuclear disposal site is planned 500m deep under the surface of two nature reserves called Ängskär and Bondskäret, “famous amongst other things for their genuine, beautiful coastal region and a number of species of orchid such as Adam and Eva.”

sinar_forsmark1swostsee_forsmark_master_final_mittig